Dysphoria: Homosexual and Non-homosexual

Homosexual Gender Dysphoria is a function of the relationship of sexuality to gender.  Here, presenting socially, sexually and romantically as a man, when you have female sexuality, is the root of the discomfort. These individuals may strongly reject using their penises to penetrate and even refuse any sexual contact with them. They wish to appear to be feminine and to have masculine male partners, and to play the receptive sexual role; anything that conflicts with these will cause dysphoria. (The inverse applies in females.)

These indicators may become visible as early as thirty months, though more commonly around forty, and in genuinely pre-transsexual children, or transkids, will likely be ‘insistent, consistent and persistent’ by age four to five.

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A child with this form of Gender Dysphoria is likely to be either transsexual or homosexual. This is why I prefer the term ‘Homosexual Gender Dysphoria’. This conception understands that the gender dysphoric or pre-transsexual child is likely to begin having ‘crushes’ on the same sex, beginning around the age of six to seven. These are romantic rather than erotic, but will crystallise into real erotic desire at puberty.

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The important points to understand are: that this is caused by Sexual Inversion in utero; that adults with Complete Sexual Inversion, if they transition, are identical to Homosexual Transsexuals or HSTS, otherwise known as true transsexuals; and that all ‘feminine homosexual men’ have the propensity to experience Homosexual Gender Dysphoria and in favourable circumstances may well transition.

Homosexual Gender Dysphoria is called, in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fifth Edition (DSM-V) ‘Early Onset Gender Dysphoria’ or ‘Childhood Gender Dysphoria’. The diagnostic criteria for this are:

A marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and assigned gender, of at least 6 months’ duration, as manifested by at least six of the following (one of which must be Criterion A1):

1. A strong desire to be of the other gender or an insistence that one is the other gender…
2. In boys…a strong preference for cross-dressing or simulating female attire: or in girls…a strong preference for wearing only typical masculine clothing and a strong resistance to the wearing of typical feminine clothing.
3. A strong preference for cross-gender roles in make-believe play or fantasy play.
4. A strong preference for the toys, games, or activities stereotypically used or engaged in by the other gender. (ie, boys prefer ‘girly’ games etc.)
5. A strong preference for playmates of the other gender.(ie, boys prefer girl playmates to other boys)
6. In boys, a strong rejection of typically masculine toys, games, and activities and a strong avoidance of rough-and-tumble play; or in girls, a strong rejection of typically feminine toys, games, and activities.
7. A strong dislike of one’s sexual anatomy.
8. A strong desire for the primary and/or secondary sex characteristics that match one’s experienced gender.(ie, a desire in males to have typically female body parts and vice versa.) (My parentheses.)

dysphoria

Non-homosexual Gender Dysphoria.

Non-homosexual Gender Dysphoria, in males, is called either ‘Late Onset Gender Dysphoria’ or ‘Adult or Adolescent Gender Dysphoria’ in the DSM-V. This is caused by a misplacement of the normal Erotic Target onto the self, forming an Erotic Target Location Error and in turn causing a condition called Autogynephilia.

Here are the DSM-V diagnostic criteria:

A. A marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and assigned gender, of at least 6 months’ duration, as manifested by at least two of the following:
1. A marked incongruence between one’s experienced/expressed gender and primary and/or secondary sex characteristics (or in young adolescents, the anticipated secondary sex characteristics).
2. A strong desire to be rid of one’s primary and/or secondary sex characteristics because of a marked incongruence with one’s experienced/expressed gender (or in young adolescents, a desire to prevent the development of the anticipated secondary sex characteristics).
3. A strong desire for the primary and/or secondary sex characteristics of the other gender.
4. A strong desire to be of the other gender.
5. A strong desire to be treated as the other gender.
6. A strong conviction that one has the typical feelings and reactions of the other gender.

Please note that the DSM follows a rolling online update process now and wordings maybe changed from those above.

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