Category Archives: Books

Seumus the dog: a tale of three pies and a pint

Seumus the dog: a tale of three pies and a pint 1974-Glasgow-1-001-300x189
Maryhill, Glasgow, 1974. This was one of Seumus’ places

A long time ago, when I was a young lad, I had the acquaintance of a dog called Seumus.

Now Seumus was of, shall we say, indeterminate lineage. There seemed to be a fair bit of black Labrador in there, but it was mixed with some distinctly non-pedigree characteristics, including a tail that curled over his back. When Seumus was feeling full of himself, he carried this high and showed to the world his anal sphincter. I’m sure that’s not in the Labrador breed book. Continue reading Seumus the dog: a tale of three pies and a pint

Enlightened Culture versus Snowflake Culture

Enlightened Culture versus Snowflake Culture snowflake-fascism-300x200
Snowflake Culture in action: rioting, looting and violence

Events of recent months contributed to a discussion between myself, Rod Fleming, and Karis Burkowski. Karis carried out the role of editor and eventually co-author of our book ‘Why Men Made God’. In reviewing the book for a second edition, we encountered several points of discussion that highlight the difference between enlightened culture and regressive-left Snowflake Culture. I thought our discussion was worth sharing.Enlightened Culture versus Snowflake Culture snowflake-fascism-300x200

Karis Burkowski (KB): The climate catastrophe is inevitable, but can still be somewhat ameliorated. How our cultures rebuild themselves in a post-catastrophe world is a valuable discussion…Self-serving cults, particularly those with medieval attitudes, must not be allowed to gain ascendancy. We must change as a species, like we did post-Toba, and do better next time.

You mentioned that the friends of atheists are Christians. That may be so in Europe, but it is far from true over here. Atheists are still ‘closeted’ in many parts of the US and for good reason…The antithesis of Islam is not Christianity, it is secularism. Both groups would destroy atheists if they could. Continue reading Enlightened Culture versus Snowflake Culture

Irrational Unknown: Fear of Madness

Irrational Unknown: Fear of Madness 1999-Dundee-Rep01-300x183When I was a child, madness was the most terrifying affliction I could imagine. The idea that I might not be able to control my own life was bad enough. But to think that I might be controlling it, yet in ways that my conscious mind would never allow, was enough to give me nightmares. The irrational unknown inside me was terrifying.

The notion that I might be someone other than the sane person I thought I saw, when I looked into the mirror, was simply horrific. The idea of losing rationality and, with it, my central core of me, that hub around which my life revolves, has always been more frightening than anything else I can think of.

This sense of horror is not unique to me. Continue reading Irrational Unknown: Fear of Madness

Matriarchy in the Philippines

Matriarchy in the Philippines IMG_2006-300x225
Pic: Rod Fleming

Western feminists, for over half a century, have argued that gender itself has been the fundamental  agent of women’s oppression. But very few have considered the consequences of matriarchy. I suggest that matriarchy in the Philippines offers an alternative.

In ‘Why Men Made God’ we pointed out that powerful, high-status women in the patriarchy were those who became a part of the patriarchy itself.  Some become consorts of patriarchal men. Others, however, become better at being men than men are.

Where the patriarchy was based on forms of meritocracy — often on the power to make financial profit — artificial barriers that might exist in less fluid societies could be broken down by women excelling at being men, and so they could rise in the patriarchal hierarchy.

This was a consequence of patriarchy. In order to compete and succeed, women had to accept  rules designed by men. They had to become adept at playing a game that men had devised specifically to favour themselves. When we look at Hilary Clinton, Margaret Thatcher or Theresa May, we must ask, how much ‘woman’ is left? At least in terms of their public personas, none. Continue reading Matriarchy in the Philippines

Wedding in Molinot — a photo essay.

Last week we had the first wedding in Molinot for five years. The Bride and groom have been together for years and decided to make it all official.  It was a lovely event, very redolent of a rural France that is fast disappearing. Yes folks, la France Profonde is contracting. Soon it won’t be there at all.

Meantime it was nice to see an event like this, with all the colour, hilarity and distinctly earthy humour. This is the Arriere-Cote.

I don’t know when we’ll see the next wedding in Molinot, so better enjoy this one.