Transition desire types: HSTS, AGP, AAP and ROGD

Transition desire, which is Gender Dysphoria if the condition becomes clinical, is defined into four separate types: male homosexual, female homosexual, male nonhomosexual and female nonhomosexual.

Homosexual transition desire

The stimulus for the homosexual form appears to be, on a significant amount of evidence, a form of Sexual Inversion caused by anomalies in the hormone (principally testosterone) delivery system to the developing baby in utero.

This causes numerous effects including more or less marked shifts towards opposite-sex characteristics in a range of areas, including body morphology but also, crucially, sexuality, such that males have female sexuality and females have male sexuality.

Nonhomosexual transition desire

Until recently, only the male form had been observed widely enough to have attracted scientific notice. However, in recent years we have seen an upsurge in female non-homosexual referrals to gender clinics.

The male form is caused by Autogynephilia (AGP), ‘a man’s propensity to become aroused at the thought or image of himself as a woman.’ At the moment, the term ‘Autoandrophilia (AAP)’ has come into use to describe the female form, but no agreed definition has yet been arrived at. On the surface, while it appears to have significant parallels with AGP, AAP also differs greatly, notably in its social contexts.

Timescales

HSTS is famously long in development. Children with it will typically begin to exhibit Gender NonĀ  Conforming behaviour in their early years, even as young as two. They will be same-sex oriented (crushing on the same sex) and cross-sex identified, from around this time. The more insistent and persistent they are, the greater the likelihood that they will transition after puberty.

AGP can often appear to set on suddenly but this is questionable. Many with it claim that it set on around puberty and they have been struggling with it ever since. The DSM, which calls this form ‘late onset gender dysphoria’ suggests that it does not appear before age nine, which conveniently matches with the earliest that puberty occurs in boys. We can therefore say that AGP does not appear prior to puberty, though it may appear at that time.

ROGD

Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria (ROGD) is an even more recently-observed phenomenon that affects principally females. In it, young women ‘discover’ they are gender dysphoric over a short time, typically a few weeks to a few months, and immediately pursue Gender Reassignment Therapy. LIke AGP, it never appears before puberty and so far it seems to be most common in the mid teens to early twenties age range.

There is still some debate, but opinion seems to be crystallising that ROGD in females is just AAP, while in males it is AGP. It is not associated with homosexuality, although subjects may become pseudo-bisexual as a function of the condition. Therefore we can reasonable isolate it as a nonhomosexual form.

This video was the first I made on this topic and forms part of a series. The others are available on my YouTube channel.

http://www.youtube.com/c/RodFleming-World

 

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